Recap: Supernatural, Episode 7.04: Defending Your Life

OFFICIAL DESCRIPTION: Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles) investigate a string of gruesome murders and discover the Egyptian god Osiris (guest star Faran Tahir) is behind the deaths. The vengeful god is putting people on trial for their past mistakes and killing them if found guilty. Osiris hones in on Dean’s guilt and decides he’s the next to stand trial. Sam steps in as Dean’s lawyer, but both brothers are unprepared when Osiris calls an unexpected witness – Jo (guest star Alona Tal). Robert Singer directed the episode written by Adam Glass.

RANDOM THOUGHTS I HAD TO WRITE DOWN AND SHARE BEFORE WATCHING

Before I head in to watch tonight’s episode, I had to capture some lingering ideas you all triggered with your fantastic comments last week. The confliction I felt over the circumstances surrounding the end of the last episode worked itself out as I replied to your comments. But!

Some of you made me realize I had an additional concern that hadn’t quite burbled to the surface until you all articulated it: Dean’s thinking he’s a killer; that the ‘people don’t change’ lesson was really about him. And once you pointed that out, my heart shook a little because I realized that yes, this…this is the real worry. I read an interview in EW this week from Ryan Reynolds (go with me on this) on a new movie he’s in called, Fireflies in the Garden, and in it he said:

I portray a guy in pain. Generally, guys in pain should be avoided. They’ll ask for the keys to your heart. Then they’ll have a few cocktails, take it for a joyride, and wrap it around a telephone pole on a dark desert highway.

As soon as I read this, I thought, Dean…because that’s him, and that’s what I feel he’s done to me (and perhaps many of you as well). He’s in pain, and he’s spiraling. It’s not in an overt, obvious way (at least not up through 7.03); it’s subtle and the tells are in his actions, in his eyes, and maybe in some of the things he says. But it’s there.

They way I see it, Sam’s story – the hallucinations, the broken wall, once again dealing with a new ‘normal’ – is the more obvious focus of the season because it’s an extremely tough, physical, apparent issue that outwardly affects everyone; however, Dean’s story – slowly crumbling walls, losing himself inside of himself, desperately clinging to something he knows to be true when everything else he’s used as to ground himself is being stripped away – is the underlying story here.

And the cool part is both stories have to play out just as they are – both are of primary importance because they are cogs in the wheel of the overall story, the last cog being our patience to see how it’s resolved. There really isn’t one storyline for one character – they’re both interwoven. From what I’ve read (here and elsewhere), I know several of you may not agree with this theory and/or think that if this is the way The Powers That Be are trying to make it work, they’re doing a lousy job.

I don’t begrudge those feelings. They are viable and come with very sound reasoning. I’m just telling you how I see it. And it’s okay if you don’t agree. *smiles*

Okay, so with that, I am heading in to watch.

Gaelicspirit

Gaelicspirit is a storyteller. She is a recent addition to Whedonverse Network, but has been writing and posting recap/reviews of Supernatural on LiveJournal since 2007. She works as a freelance writer and consultant in the real world, and is ever-connected to the six-degrees of Joss Whedon.

Gaelicspirit

Gaelicspirit is a storyteller. She is a recent addition to Whedonverse Network, but has been writing and posting recap/reviews of Supernatural on LiveJournal since 2007. She works as a freelance writer and consultant in the real world, and is ever-connected to the six-degrees of Joss Whedon.

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