Recap: Supernatural, Episode 6.20 – The Man Who Would Be King

Anyway. The boys and Bobby burst into Ellsworth’s cabin and find it empty. Not just empty, but…full-on, white-glove clean. And as they’re sweeping the place, shotguns at the ready, there’s some cool soldier-like hand motions for action. I dug it.

C.V.O.: Hiding, lying, sweeping away evidence. My motives used to be so pure. After supposedly saving Sam (flash to Sam at the light post), I finally returned to Heaven. There isn’t one Heaven. Each soul generates its own paradise. I prefer the eternal Tuesday of an autistic man who drowned in a bathtub in 1953.

We follow Cas to a flashback of a beautiful garden, flowers all around, and in the background we can see a man in a red sweater flying a kite. He looks happy, peaceful, at home once more. I spent a lot of energy in Season 5 talking about my reaction to the SPN-version of Heaven, so I’ll just let this go because it’s not really about Heaven, anyway. It’s a story about a Being created to be perfect soldier: powerful, obedient, of clear purpose and grounded as to who he was and where he fit on the totem pole of importance.

It’s a story about this Being sharing time and circumstance with two brothers and their lives and how that affected and changed him. It’s a story about human qualities bleeding into the essence of an Angel, changing him without him even truly being aware of it, and how that change wasn’t in all ways for the better. It’s about there being a reason that humans don’t have angelic powers and Angels don’t have human emotions.

It’s a heart-breaking story.

As Cas is in the Heaven, a bunch of suited-up Angels arrive. Rachel is there and is so happy he’s alive; they’d seen him destroyed by Lucifer. She’s convinced that God brought him back. In fact, she’s so convinced that even before Crowley started to play on Cas’ weakness I started to doubt. We don’t have any evidence to the contrary, but I can’t help but wonder…what if God didn’t bring Cas back?

Rachel is convinced that God brought Cas back to lead them because he defeated the Arch Angels. Cas says that no one has to lead them—they’re free to make their own choices, choose their own fates. Rachel wants to know what God wants.

Cas: He wants you to have freedom.

Rachel: What does he want us to do with it?

The exchange reminded me a bit of the movie The Invention of Lying – they were so desperate to have someone to tell them what to do, these angels. Dean nails it later, though he says it with frustrated accusation rather than realization—they are like children. Telling these uber-powerful beings that they can now have the freedom to do whatever they want when they’ve lived millennia following orders is like standing in a pool of gasoline and lighting a match.

There is a reason angels were not given free will and humans were. And there’s a reason human do not have powers and are fragile beings. Free will is power enough; and it requires consequences and parameters.

C.V.O.: If I knew then what I know now, I would’ve said freedom is a length of rope; God wants you to hang yourself with it.

*rubs heart* Oh, Cas.

Gaelicspirit

Gaelicspirit is a storyteller. She is a recent addition to Whedonverse Network, but has been writing and posting recap/reviews of Supernatural on LiveJournal since 2007. She works as a freelance writer and consultant in the real world, and is ever-connected to the six-degrees of Joss Whedon.

Gaelicspirit

Gaelicspirit is a storyteller. She is a recent addition to Whedonverse Network, but has been writing and posting recap/reviews of Supernatural on LiveJournal since 2007. She works as a freelance writer and consultant in the real world, and is ever-connected to the six-degrees of Joss Whedon.

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