Recap: Supernatural Episode 6.07, Family Matters

The thing I find interesting about this was that Sam didn’t even know why they needed to ask questions. Just that Gramps said they did, that’s all that mattered. He had an order, he had a mission. He had a job to do that he knew how to do well, and he was ready, willing and able to do it. In that way? In that small way? He reminded me of Season 1 and 2 Dean. The Dean that was “downright scary” when he was hunting. The obedient soldier that followed John’s orders with “blind faith.”

Which is so weird thinking about the Sam that rebelled against everything John stood for—and therefore, by proxy, Dean as well—when he left for school.

But the thing is…there were still so many more layers to that Dean back then than there are here with this Sam. I know Dean told Veritas that Sam was acting like him, but Sam’s only acting like a piece of him—a piece that isn’t really the same anymore. He will eliminate the evil, yes, but he’s not the same hunter anymore.

Dean: He talks a great game. But you can’t assume that family means the same to him as it does to us. He’s not Dad.

For a heartbeat, I hurt for Dean with that sentence. Because I honestly don’t think family means the same thing to anyone else around him as it does to him. We saw that evidence pretty clear in Dark Side Of The Moon. Sam’s definition of ‘family’ differed rather greatly from Dean’s. Yet…at the same time, Sam followed Gramps because he was family. Doesn’t really seem to be any other reason he chose to go there to find a unit when he came back from the cage—he could have gone to Bobby, for example. So…maybe I’m wrong. Maybe Sam has changed his definition of family. I kinda hope so.

Sam listens to Dean’s words, then just looks down. Blank.

Dean: Wow. You don’t see it, do you? You’ve got no instinct.

Sam’s silent, looks away.

D: I mean you are seriously messed up.

S: Thanks.

He almost looked hurt there—which the words were a bit mean…I mean, Sam knows he’s messed up, right? No need to rub it in. But I think it’s just starting to really sink in for Dean, the impact of what it means to not have a soul. How it’s more than just loss of emotions or compassion or remorse. Or sleep.

It’s the loss of his gut. The thing that made Sam the one to play the good cop to Dean’s bad cop. His ability to feel when something was…off. That’s…kinda big.

But the thing is, why would it hurt Sam for Dean to say those words? If he can’t feel those things, as they claimed, was he just being a smart ass? Poking back at his brother?? They made my head tilt a lot in this one, is all.

Dean: I’m not kidding. No one is forcing you to work with me. (His face stayed stoic but his eyes flinched a bit with this.) Okay, but if we do this, I call the shots and you tell me everything whether you think it’s important or not because trust me, you clearly can’t tell the difference. Or…you go with Samuel. See how that goes. Your call.

So…we started out with Dean being the ‘bossy’ big brother, and then after Hell, demon blood addiction, going their separate ways, and finding out they’re to be vessels, we get onto a more even ground with Sam calling the shots equally with Dean. But now…because Dean can’t trust him (understandably so) and Sam’s instinct is on the fritz, we’re back to Dean in charge again. I’m not saying I mind it. I’m not complaining. I’m just observing the pattern we’ve got going on here and wondering where it might lead us…knowing what we know now.

Gaelicspirit

Gaelicspirit is a storyteller. She is a recent addition to Whedonverse Network, but has been writing and posting recap/reviews of Supernatural on LiveJournal since 2007. She works as a freelance writer and consultant in the real world, and is ever-connected to the six-degrees of Joss Whedon.

Gaelicspirit

Gaelicspirit is a storyteller. She is a recent addition to Whedonverse Network, but has been writing and posting recap/reviews of Supernatural on LiveJournal since 2007. She works as a freelance writer and consultant in the real world, and is ever-connected to the six-degrees of Joss Whedon.

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